Exclusive Interview: Boondox

Boondox just released his fifth studio album, The Murder. Fourteen tracks of southern rock and rap mixed a splash of wicked, the album sees the Georgia native collaborating with everyone from hip-hop giant Bubba Sparxxx to Struggle Jennings, the grandson of country superstar Waylon Jennings.

In this exclusive audio premiere, Boondox drops an audio confession in the song “Free Soul.”

Rock Confidential also spent a few minutes with Boondox to talk about the new songs on The Murder, working with new label Majik Ninja Entertainment, and his diverse – but loyal – fans.

Thank you for taking time out for this! How are things going?

Thank you for the time and opportunity to do this interview. Things are going very well. I’m staying busy and my new record The Murder was recently released, so I’m feeling great.

Please tell me about how much time you spent putting this record together, the guests involved and your expectations for The Murder.

From start to finish, I’d say it took around four months. I had to take breaks for touring and a few other things that came up. I have everyone on the Majik Ninja Entertainment (MNE) roster featured on a track called “Outlined In Chalk.” I also have Bubba Sparxxx and Struggle from Slumerican on a track called “Born In Fire.” Jamie Madrox from Twiztid is featured on a few different tracks. I wanted to work with him on making this record and his input was invaluable. We bounced ideas back and forth and he put a lot of time into the record. It was extremely humbling to have someone who was such a major influence on me to invest so much time. As far as expectations, my main expectation or my main hope, is that everyone who listens to the record will find something on it that they like. I hope for the sake of everyone involved in the making of it that it does really well.

When you first started working on The Murder, did you approach songwriting differently than previous records? How would you explain your writing process?

It was a little different. I usually write a song and then record it, and then I’ll write another song and then record that one, et cetera. On this record I did most of the writing before anything was actually recorded. It was good in a way to actually sit with a beat and listen to it many many times before I actually put pen to paper. In other ways I feel like I work very well under pressure, so knocking out writing the day before I hit the studio adds that little bit of pressure that I like to have. I’m now getting back into the habit of writing just to write. Even if there’s no beat or song that needs to be recorded. I got away from that for a little while. Call it laziness, or whatever you want to call it, but I’d usually just write when it was time to make songs. I’ve gotten out of that habit now because I’m feeling much more inspired than I had been.

What’s a typical day in the studio like for you?

A typical day will usually start with jumping right in the booth and recording verses. I’ll do those and then we’ll do a quick mix and then listen a few times. I’ll see what I like and don’t like, and then make whatever changes, then hop back in the booth and correct anything. Getting back on the previous question about writing, I usually write most of my hooks in the studio after I record my verses. There’s no real reasoning behind this, it’s just a habit that I’ve adopted and stuck with.

We’re premiering the audio for “Free Soul.” What can you tell us about that track?

This song is one of my favorites that I’ve ever done. It’s really deep on a personal level. I’m constantly struggling with if I’m living my life the right way, and what really is the “right way” to live. Is there a higher power that’s going to judge me when I expire, am I living my life the way I want to live it or am I just living the way I was programmed to live? Should I even care, or should I just ride life out and not even dwell on the meaning of it and what comes after? Things like that.

What inspires you as an artist?

I’m inspired by other music. I’m inspired by things that happen to me on a daily basis and things that have happened in the past. I’m inspired by the lives of others. I find inspiration in almost everything. Sometimes life will throw me such a curveball that I can’t find any inspiration at all, and then I’ll eventually look back on those situations and find inspiration in that.

I hear so much in your music but at the same time it sounds completely unique. Who are some of your influences? Was there a particular artist that had more of an impact?

I can’t say that any one artist in particular has influenced me. I listen to so many different genres of music and to so many different artists that it’d be hard to single anyone out. As mentioned earlier, Twiztid was a big influence, Three Six Mafia, Outkast, Johnny Cash, Jim Croce, Iron Maiden. There’s so many. I think that’s what has shaped my music though. I’d like to think I have a lot of diversity in my sound and lyrics.

In a day and time where the rules change so much in the music business, you have managed to secure a loyal fan base. What about yourself do you think is most appealing to your fans?

It all starts with the Juggalos, which are my main base, and them being the most loyal base in the music business in my opinion. That being said, they won’t just blindly support everything that you do. If you’re not giving them something that they can feel then they will let you know it. I think that my diversity has a lot to do with my appeal, and I think that I relate to a group of people out there that came up similar to myself and have experienced some of the same things. I also have a number of people who don’t consider themselves to be “Juggalos,” and who aren’t really fans of the overall genre of music that I’m most active in. I believe that some of those individuals are drawn in by that same diversity. Many people dig that I mix in a country feel with a darker tone and that is a sound that it truly unique. If you break it all down, there isn’t really anyone doing exactly what I’m doing and that appeals to many people.

Please tell me about the relationship you have with your new label, Majik Ninja Entertainment.

Well, I had prior working relationships with some of the people that are with MNE. Of course Twiztid and Blaze. I also worked with George, who is our manager and oversees everything at the label. That really got my foot in the door at MNE and they were gracious enough to give me the opportunity to come over and continue to do what I love on a large scale. I couldn’t be happier with being a part of MNE. Everyone and everything is extremely professional, and attention to detail is a large part of what makes MNE continue to grow. Everyone over there is genuinely excited about the music that is put out. Everyone listens to the music that the artists puts out and really gets behind it. I’m in constant contact with pretty much every individual working over there. We will call, text, and email back and forth about almost every detail from the music, to promo, merchandise designs, wardrobe for shows, almost everything. That’s very important to me personally. I don’t ever feel hung out to dry on anything and I know that if I have any issues or ideas, that they will be listened to and considered. It truly is a family over there, and everyone is treated equally and interacts with one another.

How have you seen the reception to your music change over the years?

Well, when I first started there were many who didn’t dig the country twist that I was throwing into the mix. There was a lot of hate based on that fact alone. Most came around that weren’t on board to begin with. I mean there are still folks out there that won’t even give me a chance based on my southern roots and bringing those into the genre, but for the most part that’s not really a big issue anymore. I believe that with every new record release that I win more people over. I also believe that I may lose a few people here and there because some people can’t handle change and evolution. They will remember a certain sound that brought them into liking your music and if you stray too far from that they will drop you like a bad habit. But you can’t really blame anyone for liking what they like. They’ll always have what brought them to you in the first place to look back on and hopefully will give you another shot with future releases to capture that again. If not, it is what it is and such is life. I just appreciate anyone who’s ever supported or gave my music a genuine shot. If it’s not for you after checking it out, then I say thank you and hopefully one day you’ll hear something that I put out you can feel.

What are your thoughts on how new music is promoted now?

In today’s society where everyone and everything is connected, you can’t really be mad at today’s promotion methods. You can reach millions of people with a few clicks, and that’s not a bad thing. I think in some ways it loses the personal connection that being handed a flyer or a demo had in the past, but there are still people out there doing that, so really you can have it both ways. Everyone has the ability to promote now. There are people promoting themselves and don’t even do anything. With social media, you’re promoting yourself every time you post something. Some people make a living just posting a thought, or a video of themselves doing normal everyday things. Life is one big promo these days. In that way I think there’s an oversaturation of promotion which leads to very short attention spans. But if you can catch on with people then it can be a very good thing. Promotion or lack there of is definitely not an excuse these days of why you may not be successful. You just have to do it correctly.

What do you hope people take away from your music and videos?

I hope that they take away some sense of entertainment and also some sense of being able to relate. I hope that in some way I can stick with them so that they will come back and give me an opportunity again in the future. I hope that I’m able to help people or even heal people through my music.

What was the first album you bought with your own money growing up?

Iron Maiden, The Number Of The Beast, at a yard sale. I saw the album art and was sold from that second on. I’d never even heard their music, I just saw Eddie on the cover with the little devil and had to give the lady my $1.75 to own it.

Please tell me about your upcoming tour and what fans can expect from Boondox live.

I’ll be touring nationwide on “The Murder Tour” with label mates Blaze Ya Dead Homie and Lex “The Hex” Master. I’m really looking forward to this one because I haven’t done a headlining tour in a few years. As far as what to expect, they can expect to see me perform songs off the new record, old favorites, and songs from past releases that I’ve never done live. They can expect high energy, and hopefully to have a really good time. We are also doing a meet and greet before every show, so those participating will be able to expect some one on one time with me to ask me anything and sign anything that they want.

Thank you again! What would you like to say to wrap up?

Thank you again for the opportunity, and thank you to all of the Juggalos and to anyone who has supported me or ever given my music a chance, I greatly appreciate it. Please if you haven’t already, go pick up my new release The Murder, and hopefully I’ll see you at a show on the upcoming tour.

Catch Boondox live – the shows start in Knoxville, TN, on April 6 and run more than a month, hitting both coasts and closing in Michigan on May 21.

The Murder track listing:

01. Welcome
02. Peck Your Eyes Out
03. Throw Away
04. Bloodletting
05. Feed The Machine
06. Free Soul
07. Purge ft. Twiztid
08. Cannibalistic Prodigal Misfit
09. Born In Fire ft. Jamie Madrox, Bubba Sparxxx and Struggle
10. I’m A Mess
11. Outlined In Chalk ft. Twiztid, Blaze, G-Mo Skee, Lex The Hex Master and Young Wicked
12. Sittin’ On The Porch
13. They Don’t Understand
14. Terminus ft. Jamie Madrox

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